Never underestimate the influence of infinity pools - Issue #25


Hey guys, I hope you enjoyed last week’s Madness. There’s a lot more in store this week.


Good morning guys,

I wanted to share an important insight that has been bothering me for a while.

Every morning - the alarm on my phone goes off; I wake up to the reactive priorities, news, notification and messages. And, at that moment - I jolt my brain into 4th gear and begin composing emails, answering messages. Preventing my brain from warming up steadily and getting into the pace of the day naturally.

In a book called Make time, the authors talked about the notion of infinity pool expresses the tendency to be a victim to the force of infinity pool that is made available to you at the pull of a refresh.

Infinity pools are defined as apps and other sources of endlessly replenishing content.

The clarity in realising the damaging effect of 1) making this a default every morning is taking away my time from myself and 2) reacting to other people’s priorities should never be a starting point of my day. The distraction of infinity pools have become senselessly too simplistic with no frictions - everything is available at the forefronts of our fingertips.

Let me know if you are a victim to your infinity pools and if so, which app do you use most often in the morning?

In this video, Jay Shetty talks about not looking at your phone first thing in the morning will have a massive impact on your mental health in the long run. He adds in this video, having awareness towards the noise that is created by our infinity pool. This can be achieved by writing down or journaling how often you’re using your infinity pools in a day. Through awareness, you can see the physical numbers.

His second tip: creating “no technology zones”, parameter that are rule orientated. So you could have no phones while having dinner in the dining room because the physical company of one person outweighs the notification noise of 100 people.

His final tip has been - make gradual changes and allow yourself to accept this new change at your own pace.

Well, that’s all for this week. It’s about time I invest in an alarm clock.

I’ll catch you next week.

Yours truly,

Abhishek

P.S.

My home on the internet abhisheknair.org

Stuff, I enjoyed from last week...

  1. Podcast - Michael Brody-Waite | Great Leaders Live Like Drug Addicts, takeaways: 1/ We need to have difficult conversations or share our weaknesses to get where we want to get. I do believe difficult conversations are a means to make progress as it allows us to deal with obstacles. 2/ A question that I pondered on: Does parental protection/insulation create a false perception that parental sheltering is necessary to prevent children’s from not making mistakes or taking risks in life? 3/ Mask free movement - to take our mask off to be authentic and in doing, so we can live a more fulfilling life.

  2. Video - Personality Isn’t Permanent - Deep Dive with Benjamin Hardy, In this talk, a lot of useful insights were shared. Here are a few of my takeaways:1/ the concept of pathway thinking expands on the idea by giving yourself a deadline; it forces you to find a pathway to accomplish that goal within that deadline. 2/ the idea of having a follow-up signature that leads people to a different venue. 3/ Whatever you’re doing in the present, is your way to the future. It’s your view of the future that is driving your present.

Quote I wanted to share...

At some stage in your life, you chose ‘being unhappy’. It is not because you were born into unhappy circumstances or ended up in an unhappy situation. It’s that you judged ‘being unhappy’ to be good for you.

Quote: The Courage To Be Disliked: How to free yourself, change your life and achieve real happiness by Ichiro Kishimi

Video

Capture Habit

Acceptance with saying YES

Regret Minimisation Framework